Tuesday’s Speakers

Tuesday

8:00 a.m.

Plenary #5: Executing an Effective Risk Management Program

Risk management is critical to all industries, as well as laboratory environments, but unfortunately it sometimes requires a disaster to remind us of this fact. Each and every individual is in the risk management business, and each person must take responsibility to identify and recognize the elements of risk in their respective operations or activities. No one can afford to ignore the risks in their activities or assume that someone else will address the risk exposures. Once risk is identified, we all have a responsibility to understand the consequences associated with the failure to address the risk by finding economically viable solutions that either eliminate the risk, mitigate it, or find a way to manage it to an acceptable level.

Michael Fisher
Commander (retired), U.S. Navy

10:00 a.m.

Breakout Session #6A: Suicide and Fatigue in Construction & Other Industries—Something We Need to Talk About

This panel is set to discuss mental health, depression, and suicide in various industries. A great place to begin approaching the topic of wellbeing is simply just that: start the conversation. Encourage a new era of dialogue around mental and physical health, and ask for everyone to take ownership of their own wellbeing and to keep an eye out for any concerning signs and symptoms in their workmates and colleagues.

Tim Bauerle
Behavioral Scientist, Spokane Mining Research Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

Bio

Brent Darnell
Owner and President, Brent Darnell International

Bio

Breakout Session #6B: Incident Investigation

The importance of conducting effective incident investigations is to prevent future incidents by understanding and learning from past experiences, including incidents and near misses. An effective incident investigation program includes: timely and accurate reporting and classification of safety events; understanding what happened; identifying the root causes and contributing factors; discussing recommendations and follow-up actions; and sharing of lessons learned to prevent recurrence. The underlying facts, root causes, and contributing factors of events over time, or across sites and organizations, must then be analyzed for trends in an effort to identify potential broader, systemic implications for things like procedures, design standards, and practices.

Tom Knode
Director of Safety for Kirby Corporation, Distribution and Services

Bio

Richard Sears
Adjunct Professor, Stanford University

Bio

10:00 a.m.

Breakout Session #6C: Identifying Critical Issues During the Review of Lift Plans for Cranes and Alternative Lifting Methods

This will be a facilitated panel discussion on identifying critical issues that can be found during the review lift plans that may affect safe crane and rigging operations. Focus will be on topics such as tandem lifts and upending operations, ground bearing and load spreading, use of hydraulic gantries and lifting frames, use of hydraulic platform transporters, rigging selection considerations, and lifting with ship’s cranes. Discussions will highlight critical items that can be incorporated into a prepared jobsite pre-lift checklist to ensure a safe lift. In addition, the panel will discuss key ideas for the sensor technology and the benefits and challenges related to the use of sensing systems.

Joe Kuzar
Adjunct Professor, Stanford University

Bio

Travis McGuire
Human-Machine Engineering Manager, Transocean

Bio

Tim Parker
Interim Executive Authority, U.S. Chemical Safety Board

Bio

Jim Weithorn
Principal Engineering Specialist, Haag Engineering Company; and Founder, International Crane & Construction Safety, Ltd.

Bio

11:30 a.m.

Lunch Break

1:00 p.m.

Plenary Session #7: The Role of Technology & Innovation in Improving Safety Performance

Over the years we have seen a dramatic improvement in safety (and environmental) performance through the implementation of new technologies. While some of these technologies help mitigate the outcome of an incident such as seat belts and air bags, others help prevent the incident or take the worker out of a harmful situation. We have developed vehicles that can be remotely driven or piloted to conduct inspections and replace workers at height and in hazmat gear. Innovations such as robots to maneuver heavy equipment can help with safety and quality in manufacturing. What innovations are in the works and what should we expect to see in the future that will help improve safety in our working environment? We also must ask, what new risk might we introduce with these new technologies?

Travis McGuire
Human-Machine Engineering Manager, Transocean

Bio

Nigel Packham
Associate Director, Johnson Space Center’s Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate, and manager, Flight Safety Office, NASA

Bio

Chenn Qian Zhou
Founding Director, Center for Innovation through Visualization and Simulation and the Steel Manufacturing Simulation and Visualization Consortium, and Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University Northwest

Bio

Terrance Soodkeo
Global Process Safety Technical Advisor, Baker Hughes

Bio

2:30 p.m.

Networking Event

4:00 p.m.

Breakout Session #8A: Preparing University Students for Industry

The transition from a university environment to industry can be an eye-opener for students—unless they are prepared in the advance for the challenges they will face. This session will explore what can and should be done to effectively prepare students to enter the workforce from a safety perspective, as well as how modern technology can be applied in industry to improve safety. This session will also explore what lessons from industry can be applied to improve safety and instill a safety culture at the personal level, for those who are working in a university or laboratory environment.

Ken Balkey
Westinghouse Electric Nuclear Engineering Program - Director (retired)

Bio

Wayne Crew
General Secretary, National Academy of Construction

Bio

Edd Gibson
Sunstate Chair in Construction Management and Engineering, School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, and Professor, Arizona State University.

Bio

Breakout Session #8B: Case Studies - Challenges in Learning from the Past

Aligned with the theme of learning from the past, one of the most effective ways to do this is to share learnings stemming from case studies and incident investigations. This session will discuss the barriers to sharing and improving within an industry sector and across industries.

Roland Moreau
Chair, Safety Congress 2020; 2018 President, American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum (AIME) Engineers

Bio

Steve Murphy
Engineering Leader, 747 Program; and Boeing Commercial Airplane Team Lead, Air Force One Program, The Boeing Company

Bio

Jim Weithorn
Principal Engineering Specialist, Haag Engineering Company; and Founder, International Crane & Construction Safety, Ltd.

Bio

Breakout Session #8C: Interfacing Workers and Machinery in an Industrial Environment

Every year, the injury statistics continue to highlight the risks when workers and machinery work in the same environment. Workers and machines interact and affect one another daily in many industries, and it is not a combination on equal terms. The worker has the intelligence and ability to be flexible in their interaction decisions, where the machine does not. Tragic consequences may result from workers moving into the path of the unforgivable machine. This session is designed to provide attendees with the latest information on what efforts lower the risk of this interface through the use of awareness training, equipment technology, work place designs, and more.

Mark Dowsett
MineStar Technology Representative, Caterpillar, Inc.

Bio

Samantha O’Saben
Safety Chair, National Slag Association; Division Safety Manager, Edward C. Levy Company

Bio

S. Camille Peres
Associate Professor, Texas A&M University

Bio

Dave Zatezalo
Assistant Secretary for Mine Safety and Health, Mine Safety and Health Administration

Bio

6:00 p.m.

Dinner with Keynote Speaker : "The Power of Collaboration to Improve Safety"

In the mid-1990s, the fatal accident rate in U.S. commercial aviation, after declining significantly for several decades, had begun to reach a plateau. The industry’s response was a collaborative safety improvement program called CAST, the Commercial Aviation Safety Team. CAST brought together the key industry participants – airlines, manufacturers, pilots, air traffic controllers, mechanics, airports, and the regulator – to collaborate. Their work would (a) identify safety issues; (b) prioritize those issues, since more issues would be identified than there were resources to address; (c) develop interventions for the prioritized issues; and (d) evaluate whether the interventions were producing the desired outcome. CAST has been successful beyond all expectations. Although many safety experts thought that the fatal accident rate in the 1990s was already exemplary, CAST reduced the rate by more than 80% in less than 10 years, while also improving productivity. This presentation is about the transferability of CAST to improve process safety in other potentially hazardous industries, including nuclear power, petroleum exploration and refining, chemical manufacturing, and healthcare, to name a few.

Chris Hart
Founder, Hart Solutions, LLC; Chair, Washington Metrorail Safety Commission; and Former Chair, National Transportation Safety Board

Bio